Single Element Loaders: The Bars | CSS-Tricks

We’ve looked at spinners. We’ve looked at dots. Now we’re going to tackle another common pattern for loaders: bars. And we’re going to do the same thing in this third article of the series as we have the others by making it with only one element and with flexible CSS that makes it easy to create variations. Let’s start with not one, not two, but 20 examples of bar loaders.

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Different Ways to Write CSS in React | CSS-Tricks

We’re all familiar with the standard way of linking up a stylesheet to the <head> of an HTML doc, right? That’s just one of several ways we’re able to write CSS. But what does it look like to style things in a single-page application (SPA), say in a React project? Turns out there are several ways to go about styling a React application. Some overlap with traditional styling, others not

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Single Element Loaders: The Dots | CSS-Tricks

We’re looking at loaders in this series. More than that, we’re breaking down some common loader patterns and how to re-create them with nothing more than a single div. So far, we’ve picked apart the classic spinning loader. Now, let’s look at another one you’re likely well aware of: the dots. Dot loaders are all over the place. They’re neat because they usually consist of three dots that sort of

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Conditionally Styling Selected Elements in a Grid Container | CSS-Tricks

Calendars, shopping carts, galleries, file explorers, and online libraries are some situations where selectable items are shown in grids (i.e. square lattices). You know, even those security checks that ask you to select all images with crosswalks or whatever. 🧐 I found a neat way to display selectable options in a grid. No, not recreating that reCAPTCHA, but simply being able to select multiple items. And when two or more

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De-Mystifying IndieWeb on a WordPress Site | CSS-Tricks

Well, sheesh. I opened a little can of worms when sharing Miriam’s “Am I on the IndieWeb yet?” with a short post bemoaning my own trouble getting on the IndieWeb train. But it’s a good can of worms. I think it was something like the next day after publishing that short post that David Shanske reached out and offered to help wrap my head around IndieWeb and the components that

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Useful Tools for Visualizing Databases on a Budget | CSS-Tricks

A diagram is a graphical representation of information that depicts the structure, relationship, or operation of anything. Diagrams enable your audience to visually grasp hidden information and engage with them in ways that words alone cannot. Depending on the type of project, there are numerous ways to use diagrams. For example, if you want to depict the relationship between distinct pieces, we usually use an Entity Relationship Diagram (ERD). There

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Single Element Loaders: The Spinner | CSS-Tricks

Making CSS-only loaders is one of my favorite tasks. It’s always satisfying to look at those infinite animations. And, of course, there are lots of techniques and approaches to make them — no need to look further than CodePen to see just how many. In this article, though, we will see how to make a single element loader writing as little code as possible. I have made a collection of

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Am I on the IndieWeb yet? | CSS-Tricks

Can’t smash the Like button hard enough for what Miriam Suzanne has to say on the challenging technical hurdles of implementing Webmentions: The first round required several online services along with HTML & JS changes to my static site, just to verify my indieweb identity. Then more changes to the site and more online services to help fetch any mentions (so far, nothing to see, but that’s probably expected). It seems the only way

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Let’s Make a QR Code Generator With a Serverless Function! | CSS-Tricks

QR codes are funny, right? We love them, then hate them, then love them again. Anyways, they’ve lately been popping up again and it got me thinking about how they’re made. There are like a gazillion QR code generators out there, but say it’s something you need to do on your own website. This package can do that. But it’s also weighs in at a hefty 180 KB for everything

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Building Interoperable Web Components That Work | CSS-Tricks

Those of us who’ve been web developers more than a few years have probably written code using more than one JavaScript framework. With all the choices out there — React, Svelte, Vue, Angular, Solid — it’s all but inevitable. One of the more frustrating things we have to deal with when working across frameworks is re-creating all those low-level UI components: buttons, tabs, dropdowns, etc. What’s particularly frustrating is that

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